Nettles
 

  Be Nice to Nettles Week
  a CONE initiative
Nettles
 
“Stinging nettles give us an insight into both the capacity for nature to flourish even in some of the hardest urban conditions, and how plants are essential in providing us with some of the neccessities of life.

Not only do they provide excellent food for some butterflies and moths, but we can make tea from their leaves, use them as dyes, and once stung we will never forget their power to protect - as good a piece of environmental education as any.”

Mathew Frith
Urban Advisor, English Nature

 

 
 
 

Treatments from nettles

As well as the nutritional value people have exploited the medicinal properties of the stinging nettle.

Culpeper recommended the use of nettles to ’...consume the phlegmatic superfluities in the body of man, that the coldness and moisture of winter has left behind“. He also prescribed the juice of the leaves as a treatment for gangrenes and scabies.

Native Americans used the fresh leaves to treat aches and pains. European herbalists used the leaves in a similar fashion to treat gout and arthritis.

Surprisingly, although the nettle sting is highly irritant, once dried to neutralise the acid the leaves are a natural anti-histamine and also have anti-asthmatic properties.

The dried powdered leaves can also be used to staunch the flow of blood from small cuts.

In recent times the nettle has also been found to be effective in the treatment of benign prostate hypertrophy.

 

 
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Did you know?
Native American braves would flog themselves with nettles to keep themselves awake while on watch.
 
 
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