Nettles
 

  Be Nice to Nettles Week
  a CONE initiative
Nettles
 
“This is another clever initiative from CONE. It makes us think twice about the common yet important wildlife on our doorstep.

At Butterfly Conservation, being nice to nettles comes as second nature to us - we love them! Not only are nettles good for butterflies like Red Admiral, Comma and Peacock, they also have so much to offer to other wildlife. Our thanks go to CONE for increasing our awareness of this familiar and incredibly useful plant.”

Charlie Rugeroni
Butterfly Conservation - the leading organisation for the conservation of butterflies nationally

 

 
 
 

Treatments from nettles

As well as the nutritional value people have exploited the medicinal properties of the stinging nettle.

Culpeper recommended the use of nettles to ’...consume the phlegmatic superfluities in the body of man, that the coldness and moisture of winter has left behind“. He also prescribed the juice of the leaves as a treatment for gangrenes and scabies.

Native Americans used the fresh leaves to treat aches and pains. European herbalists used the leaves in a similar fashion to treat gout and arthritis.

Surprisingly, although the nettle sting is highly irritant, once dried to neutralise the acid the leaves are a natural anti-histamine and also have anti-asthmatic properties.

The dried powdered leaves can also be used to staunch the flow of blood from small cuts.

In recent times the nettle has also been found to be effective in the treatment of benign prostate hypertrophy.

 

 
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Did you know?
Roman soldiers posted in Britain were reputed to have brushed their limbs with nettles so the stings would warm them in the cold climate!
 
 
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